Buyer Agent Interview

Questions for your Buyer’s Agent Interview:

How long have they been licensed. Of those years, how many of them have they worked full time in real estate?

What is the average number of homes they sell each year?

Have they worked in a previous “Seller’s Market” (The last strong Seller’s Market in Orange County, between 2004 – 2007.)

Do they work with both Buyers and Sellers, or are they on a Team who specialize separately in working with Buyers and Sellers? Are they a “showing agent” only?

Will they be writing the offer when you find the right home, or will you be given to a different agent who will then write the offer?
Who will handle the escrow and closing process? Who will negotiate the repair request? Who will keep track of contingency timeframes?

How many Buyers are they currently working with? How can you be sure they will make you their “top” priority?

Do they work weekends and evenings?

How do they present their Buyer to the Listing Agent in a Multiple offer situation?

How many Buyers have they represented in Multiple offers in the last 6 months? What was their success record? Have them share an example of a time they “won” and a time they “lost” and why.

Ask about their support system. Who do they have in their office or on their team, available to step in if needed if – a situation needs a more advanced level of expertise, the agent is sick or on vacation, to help avoid a potentially legal situation, when you feel you need another and/or a more experienced opinion.

What is their reputation within the real estate community? Are they well-respected?

A well-known, respected agent or agent- team, may give you an edge in getting an offer accepted, especially in a multiple offer situation. . Agents prefer to work with agents they know will provide experienced, professional representation on the “other side.” This usually means a better outcome and pleasant experience for all. The opposite is true. Maybe your potential agent has high sales numbers, due to an overly aggressive approach that may have burned bridges along the way. It’s up to you to find the right “fit” for you, and work with someone you feel best suits your personality and interests.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *